Freestyling with Lane Allen: An Interview

Photo courtesy of Lane Allen’s Instagram

One of the good things writing about young talents is that you can learn what motivates them. I think it is challenging to make it big in this world of constant distraction. It is pretty challenging to be an artist today because there’s a lot of competition out there. At the end of the day, it’s all about finding a way to express yourself and also make a living out of it. I give hip-hop artist Lane Allen a lot of credit for being gutsy with what he does and also how he approached his music on the business side of things. You will never know until you consciously stir your career in the direction where you want it to go. This is something that applies to all types of careers. You have to take the opportunity when it presents itself and also give 100% of yourself to your passion.
Freestyle, for the uninitiated, is a hip-hop style of improvisation with or without the presence of instrumental beats. This is where lyrics are recited with no particular subject or structure. More like the stream of consciousness for those who are into beat poetry. It is like other styles found in jazz, where a lead player does the improvising while the band backs the player with beats and other instruments.

“My old roommate D.lee motivated me to start freestyling because he was already good at it when I was 15,” Allen responded when asked how he got into music, especially freestyling. When asked about the first album he bought, he was quick to say “Blue Side Park by Mac Miller. “
By the way, Miller passed away in 2018. He was a huge and influential singer, songwriter, and record producer from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He launched his successful career at the age of fifteen.

His single New Whip(with $teve Cannon) is now out and it’s gathering a lot of views via YouTube. This song is also available via Spotify and other music services for your pleasure. ” It was a lot of fun and easy-going (the video shoots)and nothing was forced at all. (The director) we were having fun in LA.”
I was also curious about the artists who he currently credit s as his biggest influences. “Mac Miller and MF Doom.” Doom is a British rapper, songwriter, and record producer raised in Long Island, New York. His music is also associated with artists like LIL Wayne, Drake, and Eminem.
“I’ve got 5 releases coming with a label I’ve partner with, one being a new single featuring D.Lee, our first track since 2016.”
It looks like the future is hectic and exciting for Lane Allen. Be sure to check him out and share his songs. They can provide a great boost to your day the way a brewed hot coffee does. And I think he’s got his heart in the right place.

The Unspoken Connection of Music in Aero’s Going Away Party.

 

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https://web.facebook.com/mrbaxteria/videos/10156074016908440/

Aero is going back to the US. It is time. After writing, publishing and performing original music, he is going to take a hiatus from the local culture. But he mentioned that music will always be a big part of his life. The change of venue is also probably beneficial to his music since he will continue  networking with other creative minds.

Like any cultural observer, I would not let the opportunity pass me by. It’s like being in the cusp of something remarkable or transforming. When Newry asked me to come over  to the initial venue they booked I said yes. I hopped on my new Louis Garneau commuter to park and be with the cool guys. The atmosphere was electric. I mean that because when I got there, they told me there’s a change of venue. That means riding through traffic on a humid evening. Oh no! My traffic anxiety was strong. Aero was wearing all white, calling to mind the minimalism of a Japanese samurai master. He also bleached his hair while.

It was also a bike party consisting of Bacolod Fixed Gear and Pedal Community. Gaspar was there to ease my traffic anxiety. We zipped through motorists who were trying to beat the rush hour. All was fine until we passed by a road depression. RJ, our champion fixed racer pedaled trough the great downhill and uphill with the ease of a racer. My heart sank  when I realized the rest were a kilometer away from us. Roland pointed this to me and we could not stop laughing through the climb. We could not stop laughing at ourselves and it was great not to take ourselves seriously.

 

We arrived at Munchies drenched in sweat. Cold beers await us. The atmosphere was festive. Everyone was bumping fists, laughing and locking arms. Aero was already there with his DJ equipment. His rap partner was playing slow jams but we knew there would be live performance. Already tipsy from the drinks, I was just walking and rocking my body to the sound. Then it was time for the live performance.

There is something about a musical performance that is not staged for the big crowd. After all, the spirit of Hip Hop is in the streets, the ordinary people like you and me; the passion for what’s raw and real above the ego. And Aero delivered these sentiments right there! It was not just about him performing crowd favorites like Love  or Cold Beers. It is also about drinking from the moment. He was performing with us-not to us. There is that unspoken communion of music, feelings and also needs across human complexities.

We knew we needed that moment. In our times of great darkness, we knew we will need a crutch to carry us through peaks and valleys of the human condition. And we can look back to that night for inspiration. That’s why as an introvert, I can miss the good events and the company of amazing people. But the scarcity of the meeting makes it all precious to me.